Latest highlights

A boundary current drives synchronous growth of marine fishes across tropical and temperate latitudes

A boundary current drives synchronous growth of marine fishes across tropical and temperate latitudes

We use otolith biochronologies to show that the strength of a boundary current, modulated by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, accounted for almost half of the shared variance in annual growth patterns of five of six species of tropical and temperate marine fishes across 23° of latitude (3000 km) in Western Australia ...
Read More
Predator declines and morphological changes in prey: Evidence from coral reefs depleted of sharks

Predator declines and morphological changes in prey: Evidence from coral reefs depleted of sharks

Evidence from the wild as to the ecological and evolutionary consequences of top predator depletions remains limited, especially in marine systems. Given the pace and extent of predator loss, an understanding of these processes is important. Two sets of adjacent coral reef systems ...
Read More
Reef accessibility impairs the protection of sharks

Reef accessibility impairs the protection of sharks

We determined the conditions under which MPAs can effectively protect sharks along a wide gradient of reef accessibility, from the vicinity of a regional capital towards remote areas ...
Read More

Science that matters

Our goal is to make a difference

Our research boasts high academic and real-life impacts. It is used to directly inform and influence both policy and management actions on national and international scales. We are also a member group of the Ocean Science Council of Australia (OSCA), an independent consortium of leading Australian experts concerned with advancing marine conservation.

Prof. Jessica Meeuwig (middle) was a finalist in the 2012 WA Science Ambassador Awards  

Multidisciplinary approach

Our skill set is as broad as our range of interests

With strong expertise in areas such as quantitative and behavioural ecology, statistical modelling, environmental monitoring, molecular biology, or wildlife genetics.

Teamwork focus

When it comes to ocean conservation, two brains are often better than one

We collaborate both nationally and internationally to deliver on-the-ground outcomes and tackle problems of local, regional and global significance.

Big picture thinking

Our vision is global, with partnerships and field programmes in most ocean basins either side of the Equator.

Past and current sampling sites include: Western Australia, Palau, New Caledonia, the Chagos Archipelago, Tonga, French Polynesia, the Savage Islands (Ilhas Selvagens), The Philippines, Clipperton, the Revillagegido Islands, and the Gulf of Oman.